Upcoming Seminars

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Past Seminars

CS Colloquium - Probabilistic machine learning for predictive models of mobile health data: a use case on menstrual cycle length prediction promotional image

CS Colloquium - Probabilistic machine learning for predictive models of mobile health data: a use case on menstrual cycle length prediction

Friday, September 23, 2022 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Seamans Center
Iñigo Urteaga (Columbia University) on "Probabilistic machine learning for predictive models of mobile health data: a use case on menstrual cycle length prediction"

Stochastic Analysis and Applications

Friday, April 29, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Palle Jorgensen, Dept. of Mathematics

High energy physics with quantum computers

Friday, April 22, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Yannick Meurice, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
UNI - John Deere Symposium on Machine Learning promotional image

UNI - John Deere Symposium on Machine Learning

Friday, April 22, 2022 9:50am to 2:00pm
The symposium will be held at the University of Northern Iowa, Maucker Union, Rooms A & B for those who want to attend in person and online via Zoom for anyone who wants to attend virtually. You must register to receive the link to the virtual event. Registration is free and open to industry professionals, academic faculty and students interested in the fields of data science, analytics, computer science, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and business. University of Iowa Computer Science...

Weak Formulation and Finite Element Method for Partial Differential Equations

Friday, April 15, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Weimin Han, Dept. of Mathematics

Model based deep learning algorithms for next generation imaging

Friday, April 8, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Mathews Jacob, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

An introduction to interpretable machine learning

Friday, April 1, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Tong Wang, Dept. of Business Analytics

The excitable brain: order and disorder through the lens of Drosophila neurogenetics

Friday, March 25, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Atulya Iyengar, Dept. of Biology
Colloquium - Securing Operating System Kernels with Fewer Shots promotional image

Colloquium - Securing Operating System Kernels with Fewer Shots

Tuesday, March 15, 2022 11:30am to 12:30pm
Virtual
Speaker Yueqi Chen Abstract Despite significant efforts on cybersecurity, we are observing an increasing number of attacks in recent years. The reason for this harsh reality is all our efforts aim at individual incidents and there is no deep understanding of attack surfaces in software systems. As a result, software systems are integrated with too many individual patches and ad-hoc mitigations, which slows down systems significantly without introducing substantial security benefits. In this...

Logarithmic Lipschitz Norms and Diffusion-Induced instability

Friday, March 11, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Zahra Aminzare, Dept. of Mathematics

Decision Making under Uncertainty: An Optimization Perspective

Friday, March 4, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Beste Basciftci, Dept. of Business Analytics

Dynamical Systems and Neuronal Dynamics

Friday, February 25, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Yangyang Wang, Department of Mathematics
Canceled

Optimization & approximation: the mathematical challenges of machine learning

Friday, February 18, 2022 3:30am to 4:20am
MacLean Hall
Speaker: David Stewart, Department of Mathematics

Evidence Synthesis

Friday, February 11, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Ariel Aloe, Department of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations

Introduction to Scientific Machine Learning

Friday, February 4, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Xueyu Zhu, Department of Mathematics.

Intelligent traffic light via policy-based reinforcement learning

Friday, January 28, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Shaoping Xiao, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Flattening the error curve of predictors for implicit methods in IVPs

Friday, January 21, 2022 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Laurent Jay, Department of Mathematics
GAUSS Seminar: Numbers and Games [hybrid] promotional image

GAUSS Seminar: Numbers and Games [hybrid]

Tuesday, November 2, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
Schaeffer Hall
Abstract This talk will focus itself on games. Some basic games will be introduced and their strategies analyzed. We will scratch the surface of combinatorial game theory, a lovely, playful, and often overlooked branch of mathematics. In the process we will stumble upon the surreal numbers and explore the very nature of “numbers”. This talk will be accessible for all audiences. There is no prerequisite knowledge needed, just an open mind. We will have milk and cookies! Remember to bring your...
Colloquium - Programming Languages Techniques for Controlling Generalization Errors in Adaptive Data Analysis promotional image

Colloquium - Programming Languages Techniques for Controlling Generalization Errors in Adaptive Data Analysis

Friday, October 22, 2021 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Virtual
Speaker Marco Gaboardi (Boston University) Abstract Data analysts aim at guaranteeing that the result of a data analysis run on sample data does not differ too much from the result one would achieve by running the analysis over the entire population. To achieve this goal, they have developed several techniques to control the generalization errors of their data analyses. In this talk, I will discuss how programming language techniques can help data analysts to design adaptive data analyses...
Colloquium - On Feature Learning in Neural Networks: Emergence from Inputs and Advantage over Fixed Features promotional image

Colloquium - On Feature Learning in Neural Networks: Emergence from Inputs and Advantage over Fixed Features

Friday, October 15, 2021 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Virtual
Speaker Yingyu Liang Abstract An important characteristic of neural networks is their ability to learn representations of the input data with effective features for prediction, which is believed to be a key factor to their superior empirical performance. To better understand the source and benefit of feature learning in neural networks, we consider learning problems motivated by practical data, where the labels are determined by a set of class relevant patterns and the inputs are generated...
GAUSS Seminar: Puzzles, Ice, & Grothendieck Polynomials [hybrid] promotional image

GAUSS Seminar: Puzzles, Ice, & Grothendieck Polynomials [hybrid]

Tuesday, October 5, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
Schaeffer Hall
Abstract We introduce quivers, path algebras and their representations. Then, in the case when our ground field is algebraically closed, we discuss a particular Morita invariant of path algebras arising from finite quivers, the Ext quiver of the category. Through examples we see how to compute the Ext quiver using quiver representations and techniques from linear algebra. We aim to keep the talk accessible to undergraduate and graduate students alike. Speaker Ryan Bianconi UI Mathematics PhD...
GAUSS Seminar: Puzzles, Ice, & Grothendieck Polynomials promotional image

GAUSS Seminar: Puzzles, Ice, & Grothendieck Polynomials

Tuesday, September 21, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
Schaeffer Hall
Abstract From a summer REU at the University of Minnesota, we constructed a solvable lattice model for the dual weak symmetric Grothendieck polynomials in hopes of using such a model to prove related properties of these polynomials, including Cauchy identities and branching rules. We also considered a similar lattice model construction for the weak symmetric Grothendieck polynomials in hopes of proving a Cauchy identity, concluding with a negative result. Moreover, we expand on previous work by...
GAUSS Seminar: Rotation Symmetric Boolean Functions and its Matrix promotional image

GAUSS Seminar: Rotation Symmetric Boolean Functions and its Matrix

Tuesday, September 14, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
Schaeffer Hall
Abstract Digital signatures are an important feature in any encryption/decryption scheme, as it provides a message with integrity, authenticity, and nonrepudiation. The problem occurs when long messages are being exchanged and signatures that are just as long need to be verified. By using hash functions, a ”fingerprint” of the message can be used instead of the message itself for verification, making the process computationally inexpensive. If we consider a single iteration of a general hashing...
Colloquium - Diderot: A Parallel Domain-Specific Language for Image Analysis and Visualization promotional image

Colloquium - Diderot: A Parallel Domain-Specific Language for Image Analysis and Visualization

Friday, September 10, 2021 4:00pm to 5:00pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker John Reppy Abstract The analysis of structure in three-dimensional images is increasingly valuable for biomedical research and computational science.  At the same time, the computational burden of processing images is increasing as devices produce images of higher resolution (e.g., typical CT scans have gone from 128^3 to roughly 512^3 resolutions).  With the latest scanning technologies, it is also more common for the values measured at each sample to be multi-dimensional rather than...
GAUSS Seminar: Mathematics and Redistricting promotional image

GAUSS Seminar: Mathematics and Redistricting

Tuesday, September 7, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
Schaeffer Hall
What we know, what we don't, and where we're going Every ten years, the Census Bureau conducts the Census, a nation-wide tallying of every single individual living in the United States. In addition to helping governments and researchers manage land, understand population trends, and distribute resources, the Census is essential to a key democratic function: drawing electoral districts. The process of drawing electoral districts, called “redistricting,” divides every state in the United States...

AMCS Seminar

Friday, April 30, 2021 3:30pm to 4:30pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Ariel Aloe, Dept. of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations Topic: Evidence synthesis and meta-analysis

AMCS Seminar

Friday, April 23, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Yannick Meurice, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy Topic: Finding the boundary of quantum advantage for quantum field theory

AMCS Seminar

Friday, April 16, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Jia Lu, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Topic: What machine learning can tell us about tissue rapture

AMCS Seminar

Friday, April 9, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Vincent Rodgers Topic: Gauged Projective Geometry in Gravitation

AMCS Seminar

Friday, April 2, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Shaoping Xiao, Department of Mechanical Engineering Topic: Motion Planning in Robotics by Using Reinforcement Learning with LTL Constraints Abstract: High-level robotics motion planning requires the robot to accomplish complex tasks instead of simple go-to-goal navigations. This seminar presents a research topic of motion planning in robotics via the integration of reinforcement learning (RL) and linear temporal logics (LTL). The framework consists of a Markov decision process (MDP)...

AMCS Seminar

Friday, March 26, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
Virtual
Speaker: David Stewart Topic: TBA

AMCS Seminar

Friday, March 19, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
Virtual
Speaker: Weimin Han Topic: Boundary Value Problems of Partial Differential Equations: Weak Formulation and Numerical Solution

AMCS Seminar

Friday, March 12, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
Virtual
Speaker: Tong Wang, Dept. of Business Analytics Topic: Hybrid Predictive Model: When an Interpretable Model Collaborates with a Black-box Model

AMCS Seminar

Friday, March 5, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
Virtual
Speaker: Nicholas Yannelis, Dept. of Economics Topic: Contracts under Asymmetric Information

AMCS Seminar

Friday, February 26, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker: Mathews Jacob, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Topic: Learning algorithms for next-generation computational MRI

AMCS Seminar

Friday, February 19, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Topic: Multi-scale methods in quantum field theory Speaker: Wayne Polyzou, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy

AMCS Seminar

Friday, February 12, 2021 3:30pm to 4:30pm
MacLean Hall
Topic: Harmonic analysis, fractals, and applications Speaker: Palle Jorgensen

AMCS Seminar

Friday, February 5, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Topic: AI and Machine Learning applications in Environmental Science Speaker: Ibrahim Demir, Civil and Environmental Engineering

AMCS Seminar

Friday, January 29, 2021 3:30pm to 4:20pm
MacLean Hall
Speaker TBA
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